Toyota to establish Michigan research center for autonomous cars

Toyota to establish Michigan research center for autonomous cars

Ann Arbor facility to be led by University of Michigan faculty.

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April 8, 2016

San Jose, California – Dr. Gill Pratt, CEO of the Toyota Research Institute (TRI), says Toyota will establish its third TRI facility in the U.S. The new facility will be located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, near the University of Michigan (U-M) campus where it will fund research in artificial intelligence, robotics, and materials science.

Joining the TRI facility established last January in Palo Alto, California, working with Stanford (TRI-PAL); and in Cambridge, Massachusetts, working with MIT (TRI-CAM); TRI-ANN is scheduled to open in June and target a staff of approximately 50.

“Beyond the extraordinary work that U-M is doing broadly in advancing automotive safety research – and in autonomous driving, in particular – Toyota has deep roots in the Ann Arbor community,” says Pratt. “TRI was drawn to Ann Arbor because of the strength of the university; the utility of Mcity and the Mobility Transformation Center which we currently sponsor; the promise of the future American Center for Mobility at Willow Run; and the proximity to, and synergies with, our two well-established Toyota Technical Centers nearby.”

The Toyota Technical Centers have been conducting research in the area of autonomous cars for more than a decade. A group of about 15 team members will transfer to the new TRI-ANN facility when it opens. U-M Professors Ryan Eustice and Edwin Olson are joining TRI-ANN as the area leads for mapping/localization and perception, respectively. Both will be based at the Ann Arbor office, and will retain their U-M faculty positions.

"Sensor hardware and algorithms are improving at a tremendous pace. TRI researchers will push the frontier even further, with the goal of providing safer vehicles and more helpful robots in the home," says Olson.

Eustice adds, “Ann Arbor is a fantastic location for TRI to expand its autonomous driving efforts. We will benefit from Toyota’s existing team and U-M’s research talent and facilities where we can perform extreme-limit testing in a wide variety of environments.”

Although the focus of each of the three strategically located facilities will be broad, each will feature a different core discipline. TRI-ANN will focus primarily on fully autonomous (chauffeured) driving. TRI-PAL will work on what may be termed guardian angel driving, where the driver is always engaged but the vehicle assists as needed. TRI-CAM will dedicate a large portion of its work to simulation and deep learning.

“Although the industry, including Toyota, has made great strides in the last five years, much of what we have collectively accomplished has been easy, because most driving is easy,” says Pratt. “Where we need autonomy to help most is when the driving is difficult. It’s this hard part that TRI intends to address. Toyota’s goal is safer mobility for all, at any time, in any place, and the tremendous improvements in quality of life that such universal mobility can bring.”

Source: Toyota