Toyota passes 8 million hybrids sold mark

Toyota passes 8 million hybrids sold mark

More than 20 years of development leads to market leadership.

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August 29, 2015

Toyota City, Japan – Toyota Chairman Takeshi Uchiyamada likes to tell the story of how his team couldn't get the first Prius prototype to move for 49 days. According to him, "We had no idea what was wrong, so we worked late every night trying to figure it out. We finally got it to move around Christmas time, but it only went 500 meters!"

That was back in 1995, when hybrid cars were unproven, experimental machines with a very un-clear future. Fast-forward twenty years, and Toyota is proud to announce that it has now sold more than 8 million hybrid vehicles, with just 10 months between this and the last million-unit milestone.

For a bit of context, Toyota calculates that as of July 31, its hybrid vehicles have resulted in approx-imately 58 million fewer tons of CO2 emissions than would have been emitted by gasoline-powered vehicles of similar size and driving performance. Toyota also estimates that its hybrid vehicles have saved approximately 22 million kiloliters of gasoline compared to the amount used by gasoline-powered vehicles of similar sizes.

The message is clear: having found homes in driveways around the world, hybrids have staying power. Since the launch of the Prius in 1997, Toyota has been gradually adding hybrid models through-out its range, from the compact Yaris Hybrid to the recently announced RAV4 Hybrid. As of this month, Toyota sells 30 hybrid passenger car models and one plug-in hybrid model in more than 90 markets.

Over just the past year, Toyota has made several new hybrid models available, including the Es-quire Hybrid (Japan only), the Lexus RC300h, and the recently launched Sienta Hybrid. Other new hy-brid models are just around the corner, such as the Corolla Hybrid and Levin Hybrid (China only), and RAV4 Hybrid. This ongoing roll-out will only continue, with new hybrid models being added to Toyota's range and sold in more markets than ever before.

Hybrid technologies, which encompass all of the component technologies necessary for the de-velopment of environment-friendly cars and which facilitate the use of different fuel combinations, are positioned by Toyota as core environmental technologies for the twenty-first century. Using these technologies, Toyota is also working on improving non-hybrid cars. Across the board, Toyota aims to enhance performance, reduce costs, and expand its product lineup?including that of non-hybrid vehicles.

 

Europe

Japan

North America

Others

1997

-

300

-

-

1998

-

17,600

-

-

1999

-

15,200

-

-

2000

700

12,500

5,800

-

2001

300

18,500

16,000

200

2002

800

20,000

20,300

200

2003

900

27,200

24,900

400

2004

8,100

68,700

55,900

1,900

2005

23,400

58,500

150,000

3,100

2006

36,000

72,400

197,600

6,500

2007

49,000

82,000

287,800

10,700

2008

57,800

104,400

255,000

12,600

2009

54,700

251,100

205,300

19,000

2010

70,200

392,200

195,900

31,900

2011

82,800

316,400

185,100

44,700

2012

106,900

678,000

344,700

89,500

2013

152,900

679,100

358,200

89,000

2014

171,800

684,200

323,600

86,500

Jan-Jul

111,800

389,300

163,200

45,300

2015

 

Source: Toyota